En español

One of our most popular blog posts from the past year is “Understanding Close Contact.” A lot has changed since we posted it back in November 2020—mainly that we have widely available vaccines! We’ve updated this popular blog with the latest info and have updated common scenarios to walk you through what is and isn’t close contact.


Defining Close Contact

Just because you were near someone who later tested positive for COVID-19 doesn’t mean you were necessarily a close contact. When we say close contact, we mean one of these things happened:

  • Living with or caring for a person with confirmed COVID-19, OR
  • Being within six feet of a person with confirmed COVID-19 for about 15 minutes (with or without a mask), OR
  • Someone with COVID-19 coughing on you, kissing you, sharing utensils with you or you had direct contact with their body secretions.

If you are a close contact, you might need to get testing and quarantine. See below for more information on what to do:


I'm a close contact, and I'm fully vaccinated

What this means: You meet at least one of the close contact criteria above, and it’s been at least 14 days since your first dose of a 1-dose vaccine like Johnson & Johnson or at least 14 days since your second dose of a 2-dose vaccine like Pfizer or Moderna

What to do: Monitor yourself for symptoms for 14 days from the exposure. Get tested 3-5 days after exposure. Wear a mask in public indoor settings for 14 days following the exposure or until you receive a negative test result. If symptoms appear, isolate and get tested. See our fact sheet for vaccinated people for more information.


I'm a close contact, and I'm not fully vaccinated

What this means: You meet at least one of the close contact criteria above, and you either have not been vaccinated at all or it hasn’t been at least 14 days since your first dose of a 1-dose vaccine like Johnson & Johnson or at least 14 days since your second dose of a 2-dose vaccine like Pfizer or Moderna.

What to do: You will need to quarantine. Monitor your symptoms for 14 days after your last exposure to COVID-19. Stay home from school, work, and other activities and get tested as soon as possible if you develop symptoms. If positive, follow isolation guidance for people who test positive; if negative, continue quarantining.

  • It is safest if you quarantine for 14 days after your last exposure. No test is required to end quarantine.
  • You do have other options for quarantine. These options are to:
    • Quarantine for 10 days after your last exposure. No test is required to end quarantine. Monitor yourself for symptoms until 14 days after your last exposure.

Quarantine and get tested for COVID-19 6 or 7 days after last exposure. If your test is negative, you could end quarantine after 7 days of quarantine. You must have your negative test result before ending quarantine and the test cannot be before day 6. Monitor yourself for symptoms until 14 days after your last exposure.


Was that close contact?

Let’s look at a few examples to see what is and isn’t close contact:


Scenario 1: The masked, outdoor hayride

You take your 8-year-old daughter and her friend from school to a fall hayride. You are all within six feet of each other for most of the day, but you’re all wearing masks. Two days later, the friend’s parent calls to tell you their child tested positive for COVID-19. You are fully vaccinated, but your daughter is not.

Was this close contact: Yes. Even if you’re wearing a mask or outside, because you were within six feet for 15 or more minutes, you and your daughter are both considered close contacts. Since your daughter is too young to get vaccinated, she will need to quarantine. Since you are fully vaccinated and don’t have symptoms, you do not need to quarantine yet, but should follow the guidance above. 


Scenario 2: The friend of a friend

Your teenager went over to a friend’s house for dinner. They were unmasked the entire time. Earlier that morning, the friend had volleyball practice. Later in the week, the friend finds out that someone on the team tested positive and texts your teenager the news.

Was this close contact: No. Your child did not have close contact with someone who tested positive. Whether your child or the friend is fully vaccinated does not change the fact that this is not close contact.


Scenario 3: The close talker

You have a co-worker who pops into your cubicle a few times a day to chit chat. On Monday, you have a few conversations, none longer than a few minutes. You are both wearing masks the whole time. Later that week, he gets a positive COVID test result.

Was this close contact: Maybe. It depends how long you were together. The 15-minute limit is cumulative but does not have to be consecutive. This means if you’re within six feet of each other and have 3, 5-minute conversations within a 24-hour period, you had 15 minutes of close contact.


Scenario 4: The happy hour

You and your pals meet for an outside happy hour. Everyone is maskless and within six feet of each other for a couple hours. A few days later, a friend who attended tells the group they tested positive.

Was this close contact: Yes. Even though being outside is less risky, it doesn’t change the fact that this is close contact. Whether you need to quarantine or not will depend on your vaccination status


Scenario 5: The hugger

A friend stops by for a quick chat. You both are outside but without masks and are about ten feet apart. Before she leaves, she gives you a quick hug. A few days later, she texts you that she tested positive.

Was this close contact:  Yes. While you didn’t come within six feet, you did have physical contact. Physical contact of any kind means you’re a close contact. Whether you need to quarantine will depend on your vaccination status


Scenario 6: My best friend’s wedding

You attend your friend’s outdoor wedding. It’s a small event of about 20 people, and everyone is fully vaccinated. No one wears a mask. A few days afterwards, you have cold-like symptoms and get a COVID-19 test, just in case. It comes back positive.

Was this close contact:  This is a situation where you don’t really know where your exposure happened. It might have been at the wedding, or it might have been before the wedding. As the person who tested positive, you’ll need to let your close contacts know they might have been exposed. With all the mingling, dancing, and activities at the intimate wedding, it’s a good idea to err on the side of caution and assume everyone could have been a close contact to you. Let the married couple know so they can connect you with the rest of the guests, and you can tell them to monitor for symptoms and get tested


Scenario 7: (Masked) school is in session

Your 7-year-old attends school where everyone is fully masked. Students are not distanced while in the classroom, but they do eat six feet apart from other students at lunch, when their masks are off. A boy in your child’s class tests positive for COVID-19. Your child happens to sit next to him in the classroom.

Was this close contact: It depends on how close they sit together in the classroom. Schools have a different definition of close contact when all students are masked in a classroom setting. If two students are wearing masks, they would be close contacts in a classroom setting only if they are less than 3 feet apart. This different definition only applies in school classrooms and only to students (not staff).


Scenario 8: The close crop

You are unvaccinated and were a close contact to a co-worker. Your supervisor has instructed you to quarantine for 14 days. On day three you get tested. On day five, you hear back that your test was negative. You had an appointment to get a haircut on your calendar for weeks and decide not to skip it. On day seven, you go to get your haircut. You and your stylist wear a mask. On day eight, you’re feeling a little under the weather and go get another test. On day 10, you learn it was positive.

Was this close contact: Yes. Your stylist is now a close contact to you because you were within six feet for more than 15 minutes. This is an important reminder that since you are unvaccinated, you must complete your entire quarantine. Even if you initially test negative, even if you have no symptoms, you can still be spreading the virus. If you had been vaccinated, you would not have to quarantine


Scenario 9: The kitchen co-workers

Your unvaccinated partner works in a hospital cafeteria. She wears a mask but is within six feet of others nearly the entire day. One of her co-workers—whom she has been within six feet of for at least 15 minutes—tests positive.

Was this close contact: Yes, for your partner. You are not a close contact unless your partner eventually tests positive. As a reminder, it is safest if you quarantine for 14 days after your last exposure, but but you have other options

Because your partner is anxious to get back to work, she opts to do a 7-day quarantine, which is one of the quarantine options.

This means that she can end her quarantine after 7 days if she has a negative COVID test on day 6 or later. On day six after her last contact with the co-worker who tested positive, she gets tested at a community test site.  She must wait for her test result before ending quarantine. Two days later (day 8), she gets a negative test result and can end her quarantine. She still must monitor herself for symptoms until it’s been 14 days after her last contact with the co-worker who tested positive. If she develops symptoms during this time, she needs to quarantine again and get tested.


The Bottom Line: Get Vaccinated

While getting vaccinated won’t stop you from becoming a close contact, it does mean you won’t have to quarantine if you do become a close contact. You will need to monitor yourself for symptoms and get tested, but you don’t have to take time off work, school, or your activities unless you get sick. Still need to get vaccinated? Find a vaccinator near you on our website.Read more about what to do if you’re sick or exposed and find more ways to reduce your risk on our website.


Entender qué es un contacto estrecho - Actualización de otoño 2021

Una de nuestras publicaciones en el blog más populares del año pasado es “Entender qué es un contacto estrecho.” Han cambiado muchas cosas desde que hicimos la publicación en noviembre del 2020, ¡principalmente porque tenemos las vacunas disponibles! Actualizamos este blog popular con información actualizada, y actualizamos los escenarios frecuentes para orientarlo y que sepa qué es y qué no es un contacto estrecho.


Definición de contacto estrecho

El hecho de que haya estado cerca de alguien que luego dio positivo en la prueba de COVID-19 no significa necesariamente que es contacto estrecho. Cuando decimos contacto estrecho, decimos que sucedió una de estas cosas:

  • Que vive o cuida a una persona con una prueba con resultado positivo confirmado de COVID-19, O
  • Que estuvo a seis pies de distancia de una persona con una prueba con resultado positivo confirmado de COVID-19 durante aproximadamente 15 minutos (con o sin mascarilla), O
  • Que alguien con COVID-19 tosió cerca de usted, o lo besó, o compartieron utensilios o tuvo contacto directo con sus secreciones corporales.

Si es un contacto estrecho, puede ser que deba hacerse una prueba y hacer cuarentena. Consulte más abajo para obtener más información sobre qué hacer:


Soy contacto estrecho, y estoy completamente vacunado

Esto quiere decir que: Cumple con al menos uno de los criterios mencionados de contacto estrecho, y transcurrieron al menos 14 días desde la primera dosis de las vacunas de una sola dosis como la de Johnson & Johnson, o al menos 14 días desde la segunda dosis de vacunas de dos dosis, como Pfizer o Moderna.

Qué hacer: Deberá monitorear sus síntomas hasta 14 días después de haber estado expuesto por última vez. Debe hacerse una prueba de tres a cinco días después de haber estado expuesto. Deberá usar mascarilla en interiores por 14 días después de haber estado expuesto o hasta que obtenga un resultado de prueba negativo. Si aparecen síntomas, aislarse y hacerse la prueba. Consulte nuestras directrices para gente vacunada para obtener más información.


Soy contacto estrecho, y no estoy completamente vacunado

Esto quiere decir que: Cumplió con al menos uno de los criterios mencionados de contacto estrecho, y no se vacunó o no transcurrieron al menos 14 días desde la primera dosis de las vacunas de una sola dosis como la de Johnson & Johnson, o al menos 14 días desde la segunda dosis de vacunas de dos dosis, como Pfizer o Moderna.

Qué hacer: Deberá hacer cuarentena. Controle sus síntomas durante 14 días después de la última exposición a COVID-19. Quédese en casa y no asista a la escuela, al trabajo o a otras actividades y hágase la prueba cuanto antes si desarrolla síntomas. En caso de ser positivo, siga la guía de aislamiento para las personas que dan positivo; en caso de ser negativo, siga en cuarentena.

  • Es más seguro que haga cuarentena por 14 días después de haber estado expuesto por última vez. No es necesario hacer una prueba para terminar la cuarentena.
  • Existen otras opciones para la cuarentena. Estas opciones son:
    • Hacer cuarentena durante 10 días después de la última exposición. No es necesario hacer una prueba para terminar la cuarentena. Controle sus síntomas durante 14 días después de la última exposición.
    • Hacer cuarentena y hacerse una prueba de COVID-19 seis o siete días después de haber estado expuestos por última vez. Si la prueba es negativa, podrá terminar la cuarentena después de siete días de cuarentena. Deberán tener un resultado de prueba negativo antes de terminar la cuarentena y la prueba no puede hacerse antes del día seis. Controle sus síntomas durante 14 días después de la última exposición.

¿Fue ese un contacto estrecho?

Veamos unos ejemplos para ver qué es y qué no es un contacto estrecho:


Escenario 1: El paseo al aire libre, con mascarilla

Lleva a su hija de 8 años y a su amiga a un paseo otoñal. Están a menos de 6 pies de distancia la mayor parte del día, pero todos usan mascarilla. Dos días después, los padres de la amiga llama para contarle que su hija dio positivo en la prueba de COVID-19. Ustedes está completamente vacunado, pero su hija no.

¿Fue este un contacto estrecho? Sí. Incluso si usa mascarilla o está al aire libre, porque estuvo a menos de seis pies de distancia durante 15 minutos o más, usted y su hija son considerados contactos estrechos. Ya que su hija es muy joven para vacunarse, deberá hacer cuarentena. Ya que usted está completamente vacunado y no tiene síntomas, no necesita hacer cuarentena, pero debería cumplir con la guía antes mencionada.


Escenario 2: El amigo de un amigo

Su hijo adolescente fue a la casa de un amigo a cenar. No usaron mascarilla en ningún momento. Ese mismo día a la mañana, el amigo tuvo una práctica de vóley. Durante esa semana, el amigo se entera de que alguien del equipo dio positivo y le avisa a su hijo sobre esta noticia.

¿Fue este un contacto estrecho? No. Su hijo no estuvo en contacto estrecho con alguien que dio positivo. Tanto si su hijo o el amigo estén completamente vacunados, esto no cambia el hecho de que no sea un contacto estrecho.


Escenario 3: El que habla de cerca

Tiene a compañero de trabajo que se acerca a su cubículo varias veces al día para charlar. El lunes conversan un poco, no más que unos minutos. Ambos están usando mascarillas todo el tiempo. Esa semana, le da positivo el resultado de la prueba de COVID.

¿Fue este un contacto estrecho? Tal vez. Depende por cuánto tiempo hayan estado juntos. El límite de los 15 minutos es acumulativo pero no tiene que ser consecutivo. Esto quiere decir que si estuvieron a seis pies de distancia uno del otro y tuvieron 3 conversaciones durante 5 minutos dentro de un período de 24 horas, tuvo 15 minutos de contacto estrecho.


Escenario 4: El «happy hour»

Usted y sus amigos se encuentran para un «happy hour» al aire libre. Ninguno usa mascarilla y están a menos de seis pies de distancia durante un par de horas. Unos días después, un amigo que asistió le avisa al grupo que dio positivo.

¿Fue este un contacto estrecho? Sí. Aunque el hecho de haber estado al aire libre es menos riesgoso, no cambia el hecho de que este es un contacto estrecho. Que tenga que hacer cuarentena o no, dependerá de su estado de vacunación.


Escenario 5: El abrazador

Una amiga lo visita para hablar un rato. Están los dos al aire libre pero sin mascarillas y están a diez pies de distancia. Antes de irse, le da un abrazo. Unos días después, le manda un mensaje para decirle que dio positivo en la prueba.

¿Fue este un contacto estrecho?  Sí. Aunque estuvieron a más de seis pies de distancia, sí tuvieron contacto físico. El contacto físico de cualquier tipo significa que es un contacto estrecho. Que tenga que hacer cuarentena, dependerá de su estado de vacunación.


Escenario 6: La boda de mi mejor amigo

Va al casamiento al aire libre de un amigo. Es un evento pequeño de aproximadamente 20 personas, y todos están completamente vacunados. Nadie está usando mascarillas. Unos días después, tiene síntomas de resfriado y se hace una prueba de COVID-19, por las dudas. Le da positivo. ¿Fue este un contacto estrecho?  Esta es una situación en la que no sabe realmente en dónde ocurrió la exposición. Pudo haber sido en el casamiento, o pudo haber sido antes del casamiento. Como persona que dio positivo en la prueba, deberá informar a sus contactos estrechos que podrían haber estado expuestos.  Con todas las personas, el baile y las actividades en el casamiento íntimo, es una buena idea pecar de cauteloso y suponer que todos pueden haber sido contactos estrechos. Hágaselo saber a la pareja de recién casados para que pueda contactarse con el resto de los invitados, y pueda decirles que controlen los síntomas y se hagan la prueba.


Escenario 7: (Con mascarilla) la escuela está en sesión

Su hijo de 7 años va a la escuela donde todos están usando mascarilla. Los estudiantes no están distanciados como en el aula, pero sí comen a seis pies de distancia de otros estudiantes durante el almuerzo, cuando se sacan las mascarillas. Un chico en la escuela de su hijo da positivo en la prueba de COVID-19. Su hijo se sienta al lado de él en el aula.

¿Fue este un contacto estrecho?  Depende de lo cerca que se sienten en el aula. Las escuelas tienen definiciones diferentes de contacto estrecho. Si dos estudiantes están usando mascarillas, serían contactos estrechos solamente si están a menos de 3 pies de distancia. Esta definición diferente solo aplica en escuelas y solamente a los estudiantes (no al personal).    


Escenario 8: El corte de pelo

Usted no está vacunado y fue contacto estrecho con un compañero de trabajo. Su supervisor le indicó que haga cuarentena durante 14 días. El día tres se hace la prueba. El día cinco, el resultado de la prueba es negativo. Tenía un turno en la peluquería y decide ir de todas formas. El día siete, va a cortarse el pelo. Usted y el peluquero usan mascarilla. El día 8, se siente un poco mal y se hace otra prueba. El día 10, se entera de que es positivo.

¿Fue este un contacto estrecho? Sí. Su peluquero ahora es un contacto estrecho suyo porque estuvieron a menos de seis pies de distancia durante más de 15 minutos. Esto sirve para recordar que ya que usted no está vacunado, debe completar toda la cuarentena. Incluso si el resultado es negativo, incluso si no tiene síntomas, aún así puede estar propagando el virus. Si se vacunó, no tendría que hacer cuarentena


Escenario 9: Los compañeros de trabajo de la cocina

Su compañera, que no se vacunó, trabaja en la cafetería del hospital. Ella usa mascarilla, pero está a menos de seis pies de distancia de otras personas durante todo el día. Uno de sus compañeros, con el que estuvo a menos de seis pies de distancia durante al menos 15 minutos, da positivo.

¿Fue este un contacto estrecho? Si, para su compañero. Usted no es contacto estrecho a menos que su compañero de positivo. Como recordatorio, es más seguro que haga cuarentena por 14 días después de haber estado expuesto por última vez, pero tiene opciones

Porque su compañera quiere regresar al trabajo, hace una cuarentena de 7 días, que es una de las opciones de cuarentena.

Esto significa que puede terminar la cuarentena después de 7 días si tiene un resultado negativo en la prueba de COVID en el día 6 o posterior. El día seis después del último contacto con su compañero que dio positivo, ella se hace la prueba en un centro de la comunidad.  Debe esperar el resultado de la prueba antes de terminar la cuarentena. Dos días después (día 8), obtiene un resultado negativo y puede terminar la cuarentena. Aún debe controlar sus síntomas hasta el día 14 después de su último contacto que dio positivo. Si desarrolla síntomas durante este periodo, necesita hacer cuarentena nuevamente y hacerse la prueba.


Conclusión: Vacúnese

Estar vacunado no impide que sea un contacto estrecho, pero esto no significa que no tenga que hacer cuarentena si es un contacto estrecho. Deberá controlar sus síntomas y hacerse la prueba, pero no es necesario que falte al trabajo, a la escuela o a sus actividades a menos que se enferme. ¿Aún debe vacunarse? Encuentre un lugar para vacunarse cercano a usted en nuestro sitio web.

Leer y más sobre qué hacer si usted está enfermo o expuesto y encuentra más formas de reducir el riesgo en nuestro sitio web.


This content is free for use with credit to the City of Madison - Public Health Madison & Dane County and a link back to the original post.