Graphic summarizing the table in this blog, showing public health orders that were released from March 2020 to today.

This post was originally published on August 11, 2020. It was updated on September 1, 2020 to reflect orders that happened since August 11. 

Español

It’s easy to forget how much has happened in only a few months of the COVID-19 pandemic in Dane County. Our first staff were pulled into a COVID-19 response in late January, and we identified the first case of COVID-19 in Dane County in February (which was also the 12th known case in the U.S.). Now, we have upwards of 100 staff contributing to a long-term pandemic response, and a history of orders and decisions that we made to protect the health and wellbeing of our county.

Throughout the course of the pandemic, we have made decisions based on guidance from state and national public health agencies (CDC, Wisconsin Department of Health Services) and our own local data and epidemiology. The following timeline takes a look back on decisions we made and what data and information led us to making those decisions.

Date Action Context

2/5/20

The first case of COVID-19 in Dane County was identified on February 5, 2020.

3/13/20

Madison & Dane County order prohibiting mass gatherings of 250 or more (news release)

In mid-March, we closely monitored the situation across the country and modeled our recommendations based on guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other jurisdictions who were experiencing COVID-19.

3/14/20

Madison & Dane County order revising March 13 order by including places of worship under the mass gathering limit (news release)

3/15/20

Madison & Dane County order prohibiting mass gatherings of 50 or more and closing schools (news release)

As the number of cases started to increase around the country and other local jurisdictions put out orders limiting mass gatherings, we took further action in Dane County so that we could prevent any exponential growth in our communities.

3/16/20

State Order prohibiting mass gatherings of 50 people or more

Later the same week, the state took action on a statewide level to slow the spread of COVID-19.

3/17/20

State order prohibiting mass gatherings of 10 people or more

3/24/20 State Safer at Home order issued

3/25/20

Madison & Dane County order adopting content in the state safer at home order

We adapted our orders to fit with statewide orders.

5/13/20

State safer at home order overturned by Wisconsin Supreme Court

Madison & Dane County issues Emergency Order #1, which included safer at home provisions (news release)

At this point, the criteria we had identified using the Badger Bounce Back scorecard at the county level looked promising. However, given the exponential nature of the virus, it was critical to develop a plan to open gradually and have our decision-making rooted in robust local data. We released an order to continue Safer at Home to keep Dane County residents healthy and keep our healthcare system from becoming overwhelmed. At the same time, we worked hard to develop Forward Dane, a plan for a safer and gradual reopening.

5/18/20

Forward Dane released and Madison & Dane County issues Emergency Order #2, preparing for phase 1 (news release)

Forward Dane helped us create guidelines for how reopening would look, knowing that orders would also have to be adjusted depending on the local epidemiology. Through this plan, we developed local metrics that continue to guide us through reopening. The metrics include: the percentage of individuals who test positive, the average number of daily cases, average number of daily tests conducted, hospital capacity, testing capacity for healthcare workers, healthcare worker positivity rate, lab reporting timeliness and contact tracing, community spread, and the levels of people presenting to emergency departments with COVID-like symptoms.

While case counts during this time were low (generally less than 10 new cases per day), mass testing through the Alliant Energy Center had just begun, so it made sense to pause for a few more days to ensure our case counts wouldn’t increase too much due to more testing. In addition, this phase allowed businesses and organizations to make plans so that they could be in compliance once Phase 1 started.

5/26/20

Madison & Dane County issues Emergency Order #3, which moved Dane County into Phase 1 of Forward Dane by allowing most businesses to open to 25% capacity (news release)

Many businesses that were previously closed were now able to open to 25% capacity at this time.

6/5/20

Madison & Dane County issues Emergency Order #4, which modified the last order to allow religious entities to open to 25% capacity (news release)

In response to a 17-page letter from a Washington D.C. based law firm that was retained by the Catholic Diocese of Madison, we adjusted our order to avoid a costly legal battle. We continue to recommend that faith and spiritual organizations continue to provide virtual services as the safest and recommended practice.

6/15/20

Madison & Dane County issues Emergency Order #5, which moved Dane County to Phase 2 of Forward Dane by allowing most businesses to open to 50% capacity (news release)

In June, we started to see a gradual increase in daily cases as community testing increased. However, the average number of new cases per day remained below 20 cases per day, and other metrics met the criteria for many businesses to open to 50% capacity. The metrics in the ‘green’ category during this time included percent positivity, tests per day, hospital staff testing capacity, hospitals operating outside of crisis care, healthcare worker positivity rate, and COVID-like syndromic monitoring.

6/25/20

Madison & Dane County issues Emergency Order #6, which added an amendment to Phase 2 by reducing the number of people allowed to gather and stipulated people in bars and restaurants must be seated when not in transit (news release)

From June 20, 2020 through June 24, 2020, 279 individuals tested positive for COVID-19, which was the highest of any five (5) day period before. Half of these cases involved individuals aged 20-29. 45% of the positive cases stated that they had attended a gathering, party or meeting with people from outside their household. Further, contract tracing efforts revealed that many of these individuals frequented bars or restaurants, representing the largest time and location bound clusters of the epidemic so far. This was the first of a few orders issued to slow this rapid spread.

7/2/20

Madison & Dane County issued Emergency Order #7, which further limited gatherings, eliminated indoor bar service, and reduced restaurant capacity to 25% (news release).

Cases continued to rise dramatically in late June. From June 20, 2020 through June 26, 2020, 482 individuals tested positive for COVID-19, which was the highest of any seven day period at that point. The number of cases increased by 45% in just one week, which was the largest percent increase we had experienced since the end of March. These orders were issued to specifically and quickly reduce spread in the areas that were driving the increase; many cases were connected to clusters at restaurants and bars. From 6/26 to 7/2, we knew that at least 90 cases were associated with bars at that time (and knew there likely would be more as we continued to interview cases).

7/13/20

Madison & Dane County issued Emergency Order #8, which included the mask requirement (news release)

When the order for face coverings was announced on July 7, we had just again experienced the highest ever number of cases in 7 days: 780 cases from 6/27 to 7/3. Additionally, our lab timeliness and contact tracing metric turned red, and our community spread metric was red. The mask order was intended to reduce risk broadly across the community and target the large number of cases associated with community spread.

8/1/20

State order requiring masks issued

The state issued an order requiring masks and face coverings, largely matching our local Dane County order. By this point, the average number of cases per day had decreased from 98 from June 27 to July 10 to 50 from July 25 to August 7.

8/21/20

Madison & Dane County issued Emergency Order #9, which required schools to begin the school year virtually for students in grades 3-12 (news release)

Order #9 allowed in-person student instruction for grades kindergarten through second grade (K-2). In the release that accompanied this order, we defined school metrics to guide decisions for in-person instruction.

While the average number of cases per day is still elevated compared to May and June, cases have been slowly decreasing since mid July. And while we don’t know causation, at least some of this decrease is likely to be associated with the issuance of Emergency Orders #6, #7, and #8. No decision around loosening or tightening restrictions has been straightforward, and moving forward, we intend to continue making decisions based first on slowing the spread of COVID-19 in our county, while also taking into consideration other health impacts of restrictions.


Cómo Hemos Tomado Decisiones Durante la Pandemia de COVID-19Órdenes de Salud Pública durante la pandemia COVID-19

Es fácil olvidar lo mucho que ha sucedido en solo unos pocos meses de la pandemia de COVID-19 en el condado de Dane. Nuestro primer personal recibió una respuesta de COVID-19 a fines de enero, e identificamos el primer caso de COVID-19 en el condado de Dane en febrero (que también fue el duodécimo caso conocido en los EE. UU.). Ahora, tenemos más de 100 empleados que contribuyen a una respuesta pandémica a largo plazo y un historial de órdenes y decisiones que tomamos para proteger la salud y el bienestar de nuestro condado.

Durante el transcurso de la pandemia, hemos tomado decisiones basadas en la orientación de las agencias de salud pública estatales y nacionales (CDC, Departamento de Servicios de Salud de Wisconsin) y nuestra propia epidemiología y datos locales. La siguiente tabla analiza las decisiones que tomamos y qué datos e información nos llevaron a tomar esas decisiones.
 

Fecha

Accion

Contexto

2/5/20

El primer caso de COVID-19 en el condado de Dane se identificó el 5 de febrero de 2020.

3/13/20

Orden por parte de Madison & Dane County prohibiendo reunions masivas (comunicado de prensa)

A mediados de marzo, monitoreamos de cerca la situación en todo el país y modelamos nuestras recomendaciones basándonos en la guía de los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades y otras jurisdicciones que estaban experimentando COVID-19.

3/14/20

Orden por parte de Madison & Dane County donde se revisa la orden de Marzo 13 al incluir actividades religiosas (comunicado de prensa)

3/15/20

Orden por parte de Madison & Dane County donde se prohíbe las reuniones de más de 50 personas y se cierran las escuelas (comunicado de prensa)

A medida que el número de casos comenzó a aumentar en todo el país y otras jurisdicciones locales emitieron órdenes que limitaban las reuniones masivas, tomamos más medidas en el condado de Dane para poder evitar cualquier crecimiento exponencial en nuestras comunidades.

3/16/20

Orden por parte del Estado prohibiendo reuniones masivas de más de 50 personas

Más tarde, esa misma semana, el estado tomó medidas a nivel estatal para frenar la propagación de COVID-19.

3/17/20

Orden por parte del Estado prohibiendo reuniones masivas de 10 o más personas

3/24/20

Orden Estatal Mas Seguros en Casa

3/25/20

Orden por parte de Madison & Dane County donde de adopta en contenido de la orden Mas Seguros en Casa

Adaptamos la orden para que encaje con la orden estatal.

5/13/20

Orden Más Seguros en Casa fue anulada por la Corte Suprema de Wisconsin

Madison & Dane County emite la Orden de Emergencia #1, que incluía disposiciones de la orden Más Seguros en Casa (Comunicado de prensa)

En este punto, los criterios que habíamos identificado usando la tarjeta de puntuación Badger Bounce Back a nivel de condado parecían prometedores. Sin embargo, dada la naturaleza exponencial del virus, era fundamental desarrollar un plan para abrir gradualmente y que nuestra toma de decisiones se basara en datos locales sólidos. Publicamos una orden para continuar con Safer at Home (Mas Seguros en Casa) para mantener saludables a los residentes del condado de Dane y evitar que nuestro sistema de atención médica se vea abrumado. Al mismo tiempo, trabajamos duro para desarrollar Forward Dane, un plan para una reapertura más segura y gradual.

5/18/20

Se Lanzo Forward Dane y Madison & Dane County emite la Orden de Emergencia #2, Preparándonos para la fase 1 (comunicado de prensa)

Forward Dane nos ayudó a crear pautas sobre cómo se vería la reapertura, sabiendo que las ordenes también tendrían que ajustarse según la epidemiología local. A través de este plan, desarrollamos métricas locales que continúan guiándonos a través de la reapertura. Las métricas incluyen: el porcentaje de personas que dan positivo en la prueba, el número promedio de casos diarios, el número promedio de pruebas diarias realizadas, la capacidad del hospital, la capacidad de prueba para los trabajadores de la salud, la tasa de positividad de los trabajadores de la salud, la puntualidad de los informes de laboratorio y el rastreo de contactos, la propagación de la comunidad, y los niveles de personas que acuden a los servicios de urgencias con síntomas similares a COVID.

Si bien los recuentos de casos durante este tiempo fueron bajos (generalmente menos de 10 casos nuevos por día), las pruebas masivas a través del Centro de Energía Alliant acababan de comenzar, por lo que tenía sentido hacer una pausa por unos días más para garantizar que nuestros recuentos de casos no aumentaran demasiado debido a más pruebas. Además, esta fase permitió a las empresas y organizaciones hacer planes para que pudieran estar en cumplimiento una vez que comenzara la Fase 1.

5/26/20

Madison & Dane County emite la Orden de Emergencia #3, que movió el condado de Dane a la Fase 1 de Forward Dane al permitir que la mayoría de las empresas se abran al 25% de su capacidad (comunicado de prensa)

Muchas empresas que antes estaban cerradas ahora pudieron abrir al 25% de su capacidad en este momento.

6/5/20

Madison & Dane County emite la Orden de Emergencia #4, que modificó la última orden para permitir que las entidades religiosas se abran al 25% de su capacidad (comunicado de prensa)

En respuesta a una carta de 17 páginas de un grupo de abogados con sede en Washington D.C. que fue contratada por la Diócesis Católica de Madison, ajustamos nuestra orden para evitar una costosa batalla legal. Continuamos recomendando que las organizaciones religiosas y espirituales continúen brindando servicios virtuales como la práctica más segura y recomendada.

6/15/20

Madison & Dane County emite la Orden de Emergencia #5, que movió el condado de Dane a la Fase 2 de Forward Dane al permitir que la mayoría de las empresas se abran al 50% de su capacidad (comunicado de prensa)

En junio, comenzamos a ver un aumento gradual en los casos diarios a medida que aumentaban las pruebas comunitarias. Sin embargo, el número promedio de casos nuevos por día se mantuvo por debajo de 20 casos por día, y otras métricas cumplieron con los criterios para que muchas empresas se abran al 50% de su capacidad. Las métricas en la categoría "verde" durante este tiempo incluyeron el porcentaje de positividad, las pruebas por día, la capacidad de prueba del personal del hospital, los hospitales que operan fuera de la atención de crisis, la tasa de positividad de los trabajadores de la salud y el monitoreo sindrómico similar al COVID.

6/25/20

Madison & Dane County emite la Orden de Emergencia #6, que agregó una enmienda a la Fase 2 al reducir el número de personas a las que se les permite reunirse y las personas estipuladas en bares y restaurantes deben estar sentadas cuando no estén circulando (comunicado de prensa)

Desde el 20 de junio de 2020 hasta el 24 de junio de 2020, 279 personas dieron positivo por COVID-19, que fue el más alto de cualquier período de cinco (5) días anterior. La mitad de estos casos involucraron a personas de 20 a 29 años. El 45% de los casos positivos indicaron haber asistido a una reunión, fiesta o reunión con personas ajenas a su hogar. Además, los esfuerzos de rastreo de contratos revelaron que muchas de estas personas frecuentaban bares o restaurantes, lo que representa los grupos más grandes de tiempo y ubicación de la epidemia hasta el momento. Esta fue la primera de las pocas órdenes emitidas para frenar esta rápida propagación.

7/2/20

Madison & Dane County emite la Orden de Emergencia #7, lo que limitó aún más las reuniones, eliminó el servicio de bares en el interior y redujo la capacidad de restaurantes al 25% (comunicado de prensa).

Los casos siguieron aumentando drásticamente a finales de junio. Desde el 20 de junio de 2020 hasta el 26 de junio de 2020, 482 personas dieron positivo por COVID-19, que fue el más alto de cualquier período de siete días en ese momento. La cantidad de casos aumentó en un 45% en solo una semana, que fue el mayor aumento porcentual que hemos experimentado desde fines de marzo. Estas órdenes se emitieron para reducir específica y rápidamente la propagación en las áreas que impulsaban el aumento; muchos casos estaban conectados a agrupaciones en restaurantes y bares. Desde el 26 de junio hasta el 2 de julio, sabíamos que al menos 90 casos estaban asociados con barras en ese momento (y sabíamos que probablemente habría más a medida que continuáramos entrevistando casos).

7/13/20

Madison & Dane County emite la Orden de Emergencia #8, donde se requiere el uso de máscaras (comunicado de prensa)

Cuando se anunció la orden del uso de cubiertas faciales el 7 de julio, acabábamos de experimentar de nuevo el número más alto de casos en 7 días: 780 casos del 27/6 al 3/7. Además, nuestra métrica de seguimiento de contactos y puntualidad de laboratorio se puso roja, y nuestra métrica de difusión de la comunidad fue roja. La orden del uso de máscaras tenía la intención de reducir el riesgo en general en la comunidad y apuntar a la gran cantidad de casos asociados con la propagación comunitaria.

8/1/20

Orden Estatal que Requiere el Uso de Mascaras

El estado emitió una orden que requiere máscaras y cubiertas para el rostro, que coincide en gran medida con nuestra orden local del condado de Dane. En este punto, el número promedio de casos por día había disminuido de 98 del 27 de junio al 10 de julio a 50 del 25 de julio al 7 de agosto.

Si bien el número promedio de casos por día sigue siendo elevado en comparación con mayo y junio, los casos han ido disminuyendo lentamente desde mediados de julio. Y aunque no conocemos la causalidad, es probable que al menos parte de esta disminución esté asociada con la emisión de las Órdenes de emergencia n. ° 6, n. ° 7 y n. ° 8. Ninguna decisión sobre la relajación o el endurecimiento de las restricciones ha sido sencilla y, en el futuro, tenemos la intención de continuar tomando decisiones basadas primero en desacelerar la propagación de COVID-19 en nuestro condado, al tiempo que se tienen en cuenta otros impactos de las restricciones en la salud.

This content is free for use with credit to the City of Madison - Public Health Madison & Dane County and a link back to the original post.